Cloud Adoption Framework – Strategy

Strategy is the second phase in the cloud adoption framework (CAF). Below is the slide deck I use when discussing this phase with customers. During this phase you define the business and expected outcomes. For example, a common business outcome is to save on costs for an internally hosted website. It is a common misconception that the main driving factor for moving to the cloud is cost savings, but this is a perfect scenario to uncover that business outcome and reset that outcome. While it is possible to save money moving to the cloud because of tax laws and capex vs opex it’s not very common.  Defining expected outcomes can vary widely but more common ones include fully redundant, geographically redundant, agile support, DevOps support, updating versions, so on. 

The slides include notes on each slide to help educate the presenter and provide context for a discussion during the presentation. 

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Cloud Adoption Framework – Introduction

The Microsoft Cloud Adoption Framework for Azure guides customers through their cloud journey, to use and adopt cloud services with confidence and in control. In this episode, Scott Bockheim explores the guidance and documentation of the framework with Lara Rubbelke to provide an overview of all the components and elements included.

The Microsoft Cloud Adoption Framework for Azure guides customers through their cloud journey, to use and adopt cloud services with confidence and in control.

The most common comments I hear regarding the cloud adoption framework is:

  • it is too massive (hundreds of pages)
  • too complex
  • and the steps are confusing

In the next few posts, I will share the decks and corresponding collateral that I use with customers when I am hired to help them migrate to the cloud. The decks are a mix of information from the cloud adoption framework (CAF), my own process to supplement the CAF, and feedback from customers I have migrated. I have worked on countless projects over the years and I have refined my process and distilled it down to what I feel is useful for customers and not overwhelming.

Full disclosure, I do follow the Azure CAF instead of the AWS CAF because Microsoft has invested a considerable amount of effort into building theirs while AWS is lacking IMO. GCP has one too if you would like to check it out. I do take some bits from AWS and I include links to GCP and AWS tools if you are adopting one of them for your cloud. But overall Microsoft has done a better job IMO and provides the most comprehensive CAF, and even goes out of their way to agnostic in lots of areas of their documentation.